Deepfake Video of Mark Zuckerberg Goes Viral on Eve of House A.I. Hearing

Move over, Nancy Pelosi.

A “deepfake” video featuring the likeness of Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg declaring “whoever controls the data, controls the future” has surfaced, triggering a new round of questions (and smirks) about how to deal with the rise of doctored videos on the eve of a Congressional hearings on the matter.

Facebook was hit with harsh criticism last month when it refused to pull from its platform a crudely altered video of House Speaker Nancy who appeared to be drunkenly stumbling over her words. President Donald Trump shared the clip on Twitter with the caption, “PELOSI STAMMERS THROUGH NEWS CONFERENCE.”

The Pelosi video is likely to get plenty of attention at tomorrow’s hearing convened by the House Intelligence Committee “on the national security challenges of artificial intelligence (AI), manipulated media, and ‘deepfake’ technology.” The House committee is concerned not only with the national security implications, but, it said in a statement, with “democratic governance, with individuals and voters no longer able to trust their own eyes or ears when assessing the authenticity of what they see on their screens.”

At the rate the technology is progressing it won’t be long before board rooms take up the matter too. Adobe Research and others demonstrated just this week a deepfake tool powered by text-to-speech machine learning algorithms that can literally put words in the mouth of whomever appears in a video.

The digitally altered Zuckerberg video, which runs less than 20 seconds, appeared on Instagram over the weekend. To make the fake, two British artists used AI tools developed by the Israeli digital media company, Canny AI, which runs with the prominent tagline “Storytelling without Barriers” on its homepage. The video languished in obscurity at first, but then went viral in recent hours, collecting more than 30,000 views and counting. By this morning, discussion of the Zuckerberg deepfake was trending on Twitter.

In the video, Zuckerberg appears to be speaking to CBS News. A banner saying, “Zuckerberg: Announces New Measures to ‘Protect Elections'” appears at the bottom of the screen. But his words tell a different story. “Imagine this for a second: One man, with total control of billions of people’s stolen data, all their secrets, their lives, their futures,” he begins.

The video is unlikely to hoodwink anyone, but it’s hardly a flattering look for Facebook and Zuckerberg. Deepfake Zuck, as the AI-powered character is being called, “looks quite a bit like a Weekend At Bernie’s-style corpse-marionette,” Gizmodo quips.

In a statement emailed to tech journalists, a spokesperson for Instagram said they will leave the fake video up–for now. “We will treat this content the same way we treat all misinformation on Instagram. If third-party fact-checkers mark it as false, we will filter it from Instagram’s recommendation surfaces like Explore and hashtag pages.”

The video emerged just before the release of a new report on deepfakes and synthetic media by Witness, a human rights organization that has been organizing training sessions with journalists and social justice activists on how to use the latest technologies to safely report on abuses or power. With deepfakes, the concern among activists and journalists is that the technology will be used to discredit the authenticity of their work and even attack them personally, said Sam Gregory, the program director at Witness. “This is an example of an emerging threat” to spread misinformation and doubts about human rights work, he said.

One of the problems Gregory sees around deepfakes is what he calls “the tools gap.” The technology to build deep fakes is ramping up quickly; you don’t even need to be technically savvy to use them. But there are far fewer resources available to detect the fakes once they’re in the wild. Witness has discussed with technology firms the importance of them sharing the underlying training data that goes into their deepfakes algorithms. “As companies release products that enable creation, they should release products that enable detection as well,” Gregory says.

The role technology companies play in the proliferation of this technology will be a big talking point at tomorrow’s hearing on the Hill. Scheduled to testify are law and IT professors, plus a policy advisor at OpenAI, an AI think tank funded by Reid Hoffman’s charitable foundation and Khosla Ventures.

Facebook, which has been embroiled in the deepfakes controversy since the emergence of Pelosi video, is not scheduled to send anybody to participate in the hearings.

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As States Like Texas Move to Ban Tobacco Sales To Anyone Under 21, Retailers are Adapting Too

Starting September 1, you’ll have to be drinking age to buy cigarettes and other tobacco products in Texas.

Texas Governor Greg Abbott signed into law a bill that prohibits the sale of cigarettes and other tobacco products, including e-cigarettes to anyone under the age of 21. Texas is joining a growing list of states and municipalities tightening laws on tobacco use. Those caught breaking this law could face fines up to $500. The new law does not apply to military service members.

The legal age is already 21 in states including California, Hawaii, Maine, Maryland, Massachusetts, New Jersey, Utah, and Vermont among others. Laws in Arkansas, Illinois and Virginia will take effect later this year. The New York State Senate passed similar legislation in April which Governor Andrew Cuomo is expected to sign.

Retailers like Kroger, 7-Eleven and gas station chains like Shell, Exxon, and Mobil have already changed their policies. Walmart will also stop selling cigarettes to those under 21 starting next month.

Walgreens has also embraced this attitude shift after mounting public pressure. The retailer announced they will require customers to be at least 21 years old in order to purchase tobacco products in its stores nationwide starting September 1st.

E-Cigarette manufacturer Juul also voiced support of raising age restrictions claiming that this restriction “can successfully address this public health concern while preserving access for adult smokers looking for an alternative to combustible cigarettes.”

Nine out of every ten smokers start smoking by age 18 according to a Surgeon General report released in June 2017.

In Washington D.C., Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell introduced a bill in April that would take this ban nationwide. McConnell’s home state of Kentucky is the second highest producer of tobacco in the United States.

Altaria, Philip Morris International’s parent company, said in response to the federal bill “The number one way kids today get access to tobacco products is by obtaining them from legal age purchasers. Approximately 80% of high school students in the U.S. turn 18 years old before graduation. By raising the minimum age to 21, no high school student will be able to purchase tobacco products legally, adding another hurdle to help reduce social access.”

However, Phillip Morris came under fire last month after reports surfaced that the company used social media influencers targeting the 18 -25 demographic to promote their e-cigarette product, the IQOS device. Phillp Morris denies these claims. The tobacco giant hired social media influencers abroad said the product is a safer alternative to cigarettes despite the research that suggests otherwise.

Smokers who have used e-cigarettes may be at increased risk for not being able to quit smoking according to the American Journal of Public Health. E-cigarette usage climbed 78 percent over the last year according to the CDC.

Some cities and retailers have taken these restrictions a step further. Just last week, the city of Beverly Hills, California also outlawed the sale of tobacco products entirely.

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Richard Nixon’s ‘Western White House’ Is Back on the Market—At a Discount

For sale: A luxurious Spanish colonial mansion along the Pacific Ocean that was once nicknamed the “Western White House,” home to one of the most scandalized presidents in American history.

Richard Nixon’s former presidential retreat in San Clemente, Calif., is back on the market for $57.5 million, a nearly $7 million discount from its most recent asking price last year, and a 23% discount from its original price of $75 million four years ago.

There were no takers when the Southern California property, situated between Los Angeles and San Diego, was first listed at $75 million in 2015 and taken off the market later that year. The property was then priced at $69 million, and, as recently as last year at $63.5 million, before it was taken off the market again about six months ago.

Richard Nixon’s Western White Housecoyote

The current price listing was posted about a month ago.

Nixon bought the estate on a secluded coastal bluff at the southern end of San Clemente in 1969. He dubbed the property La Casa Pacifica. The site has a 9,000-square-foot mansion with seven bedrooms, a 3,000-square-foot poolside entertaining pavilion with guest wing, a two-bedroom guest house, and a swimming pool with ocean views.

During his presidency, Nixon and then-First Lady Pat Nixon hosted many heads of state there, including the secretary-general of the Soviet Communist party Leonid Brezhnev. Nixon and Brezhnev signed the Soviet-American communique there in 1973.

Nixon also held fundraising events at the San Clemente home, inviting luminaries like Ronald Reagan and Frank Sinatra, according to the website, Mansion Global. The location is adjacent to Camp Pendleton Marine Base, offering convenient access to Air Force One and additional security.

Richard Nixon’s Western White HouseJim Bartsch / TopTenRealEstate

However, the property’s political ties date back decades before Nixon’s purchase. Hamilton Cotton, a financial partner of San Clemente founder Ole Hanson, built the home in 1926, according to reports. Cotton was a Democratic Party supporter who entertained President Franklin D. Roosevelt. It is believed that they played poker on the site.

Nixon also wrote his memoirs at the home, several years after resigning from the presidency following the Watergate scandal. He eventually sold the property in the mid-1980s to current owner Allergan Pharmaceuticals chief executive Gavin S. Herbert.

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As States Like Texas Move to Ban Tobacco Sales To Anyone Over 21, Retailers are Adapting Too

Starting September 1, you’ll have to be drinking age to buy cigarettes and other tobacco products in Texas.

Texas Governor Greg Abbott signed into law a bill that prohibits the sale of cigarettes and other tobacco products, including e-cigarettes to anyone under the age of 21. Texas is joining a growing list of states and municipalities tightening laws on tobacco use. Those caught breaking this law could face fines up to $500. The new law does not apply to military service members.

The legal age is already 21 in states including California, Hawaii, Maine, Maryland, Massachusetts, New Jersey, Utah, and Vermont among others. Laws in Arkansas, Illinois and Virginia will take effect later this year. The New York State Senate passed similar legislation in April which Governor Andrew Cuomo is expected to sign.

Retailers like Kroger, 7-Eleven and gas station chains like Shell, Exxon, and Mobil have already changed their policies. Walmart will also stop selling cigarettes to those under 21 starting next month.

Walgreens has also embraced this attitude shift after mounting public pressure. The retailer announced they will require customers to be at least 21 years old in order to purchase tobacco products in its stores nationwide starting September 1st.

E-Cigarette manufacturer Juul also voiced support of raising age restrictions claiming that this restriction “can successfully address this public health concern while preserving access for adult smokers looking for an alternative to combustible cigarettes.”

Nine out of every ten smokers start smoking by age 18 according to a Surgeon General report released in June 2017.

In Washington D.C., Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell introduced a bill in April that would take this ban nationwide. McConnell’s home state of Kentucky is the second highest producer of tobacco in the United States.

Altaria, Philip Morris International’s parent company, said in response to the federal bill “The number one way kids today get access to tobacco products is by obtaining them from legal age purchasers. Approximately 80% of high school students in the U.S. turn 18 years old before graduation. By raising the minimum age to 21, no high school student will be able to purchase tobacco products legally, adding another hurdle to help reduce social access.”

However, Phillip Morris came under fire last month after reports surfaced that the company used social media influencers targeting the 18 -25 demographic to promote their e-cigarette product, the IQOS device. Phillp Morris denies these claims. The tobacco giant hired social media influencers abroad said the product is a safer alternative to cigarettes despite the research that suggests otherwise.

Smokers who have used e-cigarettes may be at increased risk for not being able to quit smoking according to the American Journal of Public Health. E-cigarette usage climbed 78 percent over the last year according to the CDC.

Some cities and retailers have taken these restrictions a step further. Just last week, the city of Beverly Hills, California also outlawed the sale of tobacco products entirely.

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–A red flag to investors: The stock market may be hitting the “triple top”

–The Renault deal is dead, but Fiat Chrysler still needs a partner

–Many economists think the next recession will be before the 2020 election

–The S&P 500 has performed far worse under Trump than Obama

–Listen to our new audio briefing, Fortune 500 Daily

Don’t miss the daily Term Sheet, Fortune‘s newsletter on deals and dealmakers.

Ford Issues Multiple Recalls for 1.3 Million Vehicles

Ford, on Wednesday, issued four recalls for its vehicles, including more than 1.2 Ford Explorer SUVs, which have an flaw that could result in drivers losing steering control of the vehicles.

The automaker will alert owners of all Explorers made between May 17, 2010, through Jan. 26, 2017 (2011-2017 models) of the issue. The defect could result in a fractured rear suspension, which affects steering.

The company says it is not aware of any injuries related to the defect.

While the Explorer recall was certainly the largest issued Wednesday by Ford, it wasn’t the only one. The company also expanded the recall of certain F-150 pick-ups by another 123,000. The company has already recalled 1.5 million of the trucks due to a transmission flaw that could cause the vehicles to downshift to first gear with no warning.

The new action, says Ford, is for F-150s equipped with 5-liter and 6.2-liter gas engines. Those vehicles were not sufficiently repaired in a previous recall.

Also recalled were 4,300 Ford Econoline vans, made between 2009-2016, which could have a welding flaw and 12,000 vehicles in Canada, which also risk losing steering control. The Canadian recalls are limited to the provinces of Alberta, Manitoba and Saskatchewan and include select 2010-2017 Ford Taurus, 2009-2017 Ford Flex, 2009-2015 Lincoln MKS and 2010-2017 Lincoln MKT vehicles.

Earlier this year, Ford recalled 953,000 vehicles, including 782,000 in the United States, as part of the Takata airbag inflator recall. In December 2018, it again recalled F-150 pickups, some 874,000 of them, due to fire concerns.

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How to Build a Thriving Multi-Generational Workforce

This isn’t your grandfather’s workforce. Once dominated by a single generation (not to mention gender), today’s spans many, with employees working away sometimes into their eighties and nineties. Beyond old-fashioned employees, there are contractors and gig workers, and they tend to be tethered to work at all times. (There’s no punching out on your company’s smartphone). With millennials leading the charge, workers today tend to be more outspoken and demanding about certain things–particularly when it comes to the values of the companies they work for.

Given the new status quo, does the old-fashioned employer-employee contract hold? What can management do to attract and retain the talent, and build a thriving workforce? Top executives gathered at the Fortune CEO Initiative on Tuesday to discuss how companies can best to engage employees given these new realities.

The business leaders agreed purpose and values have become increasingly important to workers in recent years–and that they’re a key factor in attracting talent. Many noted the importance for companies and corporate leaders to consistently apply and model these values; few things can be as disillusioning to employees as seeing gaps between the values preached externally and values practiced internally, said experts. Many of the CEOs also spoke of the benefits of engaging employees at all levels in the creation and discussion of corporate values, which they noted was more effective than simply dictating those values top down.

Also essential, the CEO participants agreed, is being transparent and “brutally honest” about employee expectations and corporate culture from the first moment a company representative makes contact with a prospective hire. They noted many firms try to win talent through the rosier lens of the recruitment process–which leads to distrust once those employees start working in the actual environment.

Given the multi-generational nature of the workforce, the CEOs advocated for more personally tailored benefit plans that better serve the needs of individual workers. The needs of a millennial employee are often very different than from individuals who are many decades into their career. One firm, for example, had noticed that millennial employees weren’t taking advantage of their 401K match; it turned out that was because those employees were using the money to pay off their student loans. The company offered to extend the same match to student loan repayment.

The leaders also argued that workplaces need to embrace the broad demographics of their employee bases by developing and encouraging multi-generational and multi-ethnic teams. There is evidence that bringing together diverse perspectives in this way leads to greater innovation and performance.

Experts at the session also noted that employees today crave–more than trendy perks like free snacks and foosball tables–development opportunities, in which they’re given a chance to learn new skills and be exposed to new challenges, whether that be a job in a different part of the world or company. For that reason, rotational programs are coming back in fashion, said one expert attending the session.

Key to all of this is good management. The participant executives and experts agreed that companies often do too little to train their middle managers to develop and nurture talent, and critically, they often don’t hold them accountable for this important element of the business. The group agreed that CEOs need to model such mentoring relationships and that much of the success of the workforce depends on a a group of middle managers that embody the values of the company and dedicate time to developing their employees.

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Businesses Are Getting Spooked by Trump’s Trade Policy

President Donald Trump’s aggressive and wildly unpredictable use of tariffs is spooking American business groups, which have long formed a potent force in his Republican Party.

Corporate America was blindsided last week when Trump threatened to impose crippling taxes on Mexican imports in a push to stop the flow of Central American migrants into the United States.

The two sides reached a truce Friday after Mexico agreed to do more to stop the migrants. But by Monday, Trump was again threatening the tariffs if Mexico didn’t abide by an unspecified commitment, to “be revealed in the not too distant future.”

Such whipsawing is now a hallmark of Trump’s trade policy. The president repeatedly threatens tariffs, sometimes imposes them, sometimes suspends them, sometimes threatens them again. Or drops them.

Business groups, already uncomfortable with Trump’s attempts to stem immigration, are struggling to figure out where to stand in the fast-shifting political climate. They have happily supported Trump’s corporate tax cuts and moves to loosen environmental and other regulations. But the capriciousness of Trump’s use of tariffs has proved alarming.

“Business is losing,” said Rick Tyler, a Republican strategist and frequent Trump critic. “He calls himself ‘Mr. Tariff man.’ He’s proud of it… It’s bad news for the party. It’s bad news for the free market.”

“It was a good wakeup call for business,” James Jones, chairman of Monarch Global Strategies and a former U.S. ambassador to Mexico, said of Trump’s abrupt move to threaten to tax Mexican goods.

Just last week, the sprawling network led by the billionaire industrialist Charles Koch announced the creation of several political action committees focused on policy — including one devoted to free trade — to back Republicans or Democrats who break with Trump’s trade policies. A powerful force in Republican politics, the network is already a year into a “multi-year multi-million dollar” campaign to promote the dangers of tariff and protectionist trade policies.

The Chamber of Commerce, too, is in the early phases of disentangling itself from the Republican Party after decades of loyalty. The Chamber, which spent at least $29 million largely to help Republicans in the 2016 election, announced earlier this year that it would devote more time and attention to Democrats on Capitol Hill while raising the possibility of supporting Democrats in 2020.

Few expect the Chamber or business-backed groups like the Koch network to suddenly embrace Democrats in a significant way. But even a subtle shift to withhold support from vulnerable Republican candidates could make a difference in 2020.

Trump’s boundless enthusiasm for tariffs has upended decades of Republican trade policy that favored free trade. It has left the party’s traditional allies in the business world struggling to maintain political relevance in the Trump era.

Trump’s tariffs are taxes paid by American importers and are typically passed along to their customers. They can provoke retaliatory tariffs on U.S. exports. And they can paralyze businesses, uncertain about where they should buy supplies or situate factories.

“Knowing the rules helps us plan for the future,” said Jeff Schwager, president of Sartori, a cheese company that has had to contend with retaliatory tariffs in Mexico in an earlier dispute.

Trump seems unfazed.

Myron Brilliant, head of international affairs at the U.S. Chamber of Commerce, went on CNBC on Monday to decry “the weaponization of tariffs” as a threat to the U.S. economy and to relations with trading partners.

Trump responded by phoning in to the network to declare “I guess he’s not so brilliant” and defend his trade policies.

“Tariffs,” he said, “are a beautiful thing.”

Trump can afford to be confident about his grip over the party: Roughly nine in 10 rank-and-file Republicans support his performance as president, according to the latest Gallup polling. So Republicans in Congress have been reluctant to tangle with him.

But last week’s flareup over the Mexico tariffs may prove to be a pivotal juncture. The spat was especially alarming to businesses because it came seemingly out of nowhere. Less than two weeks earlier, Trump had lifted tariffs on Mexican and Canadian steel and aluminum — action that seemed to signal warmer commercial ties between the United States and its neighbors.

“This really came out of left field,” said Daniel Ujczo, a trade lawyer at Dickinson Wright. “It was something we thought we had settled, and we hadn’t.”

Congress was already showing signs of wariness, especially over Trump’s decision to dust off a little-used provision of trade law to slap tariffs on trading partners. Section 232 of the Trade Expansion of 1962 lets the president impose sanctions on imports that he deems a threat to national security.

Trump has deployed that provision to tax imported steel and aluminum. And he’s threatening to impose Section 232 tariffs on auto imports, a chilling threat to American allies Japan and the European Union.

Congress is considering bipartisan legislation to weaken the president’s authority to declare national-security tariffs. In doing so, lawmakers would be reasserting Congress’ authority over trade policy, established by the Constitution but ceded over the years to the White House.

The legislation has stalled in Congress this spring. But on Tuesday, Iowa Republican Chuck Grassley, chairman of the Senate Finance Committee, said the bill would be ready “pretty soon.” Given “how the president feels about tariffs,” Grassley said, “he may not look favorably on this. So I want a very strong vote in my committee and then, in turn, a very strong vote on the floor of the Senate.”

Congressional reluctance to challenge Trump could be tested in coming months. Lawmakers may balk if he proceeds with plans to tax $300 billion worth of Chinese goods that he hasn’t already targeted with tariffs — a move that would jack up what consumers pay for everything from bicycles to burglar.

Likewise, taxing auto imports — an idea that has virtually no support outside the White House — would likely meet furious resistance. So would any move to abandon a trade pact with Mexico and Canada. Trump has threatened to withdraw from the 25-year-old North American Free Trade Agreement if Congress won’t ratify a revamped version he negotiated last year.

For all their disenchantment with Trump, the Chamber of Commerce may yet find it hard to break its ties to the party. Though the chamber says it’s weighing a more bipartisan approach, it recently featured a sign on its front steps: It likened Trump to Republican icons Ronald Reagan and Dwight Eisenhower.

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–Listen to our new audio briefing, Fortune 500 Daily

Get up to speed on your morning commute with Fortune‘s CEO Daily newsletter.

Beyond Meat Stock Soars as Tim Hortons Introduces Faux-Meat Breakfast Sandwiches

Beyond Meat Inc. got a reprieve from two downgrades in as many days after Tim Hortons said it’s now offering faux-meat breakfast sandwiches at almost 4,000 locations across Canada.

The plant-based meat products maker gained as much as 13% after the coffee-and-doughnuts chain said it added three breakfast sandwiches to the menu made with Beyond Meat sausages after testing them at select stores last month.

The stock reversed earlier losses driven by Sanford C. Bernstein & Co.’s decision Wednesday to cut its rating on Beyond Meat to market perform from outperform, saying shares of the company have gotten too expensive after a more than 400% rally since its May 1 initial public offering. On Tuesday, JPMorgan Chase & Co.’s similar move spurred a 25% decline, Beyond Meat’s worst day since the debut.

Last week, the company reported quarterly earnings for the first time since the IPO, fueling optimism among investors when it said sales would exceed $210 million this year, topping analysts’ estimates. It also said earnings before interest, taxes, depreciation and amortization would break even, compared with projections it would have a loss. The results reinforce that consumer demand for alternative meat products is on the rise.

The question now is whether supply can rise fast enough to meet demand. Burrito chain Freebirds, which has more than 70 locations in the U.S., announced on its website that it has temporarily halted sales of its Beyond Meat-based Mexican fare “due to a supply shortage” from the company. The fast-food chain said it expects to begin offering the meat alternative again on June 17. Freebirds and Beyond Meat didn’t reply to a request for comment.

Meanwhile, competition is heating up in the alternative-meat industry. Rival Impossible Foods recently announced an expansion with Burger King, while food giants like Tyson Foods Inc. and Nestle SA are working on their own products.

Slack to Be Valued Around $17 Billion in IPO Next Week

Slack Technologies Inc. is expected to be valued by investors at $16 billion to $17 billion when it lists its shares publicly next week, according to people familiar with the matter.

That valuation is roughly based on the workplace chat and collaboration software company’s projected revenue and current growth rate, said the people, who asked not to be identified discussing private talks.

The expected value is up from the $7.1 billion in its last private funding round in August. It’s similar to the company’s share sales on the private market, where in April investors were snapping up stock at prices that would give the company a valuation of about $16 billion.

A spokeswoman for Slack declined to comment.

Slack is planning to have its shares start trading June 20 on the New York Stock Exchange under the ticker WORK.

Investors’ valuation expectations are based on some back-of-the-envelope math: Slack said Monday that it expects at least $590 million in revenue in its 2020 fiscal year, which ends January. That’s a growth rate of as much as 50% compared with the previous year.

That suggests the company could bring in almost $900 million in fiscal year 2021, and investors are looking to value the company at roughly 20 times that projected revenue, the people said.

That’s even as the annual revenue growth rate has slowed from 110% and 82% in the 2018 and 2019 fiscal years, respectively, according to a regulatory filing.

Slack said in its filings with the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission that it can’t guarantee that its plans to increase revenue and cut operating losses will ever allow it to become profitable.

Slack is also rolling out partnerships with other software companies. Dropbox Inc., the document-management software developer that went public last year, announced on Tuesday that it had integrated Slack into its workplace product.

Unlike a surge of tech companies that have gone public this year in traditional initial public offerings, Slack is going public through an unusual direct listing. The company won’t issue new shares to raise funds for itself. Rather, its investors will be allowed to begin selling existing shares immediately.

New technology stock offerings have been on the upswing this year. On Tuesday, CrowdStrike Holdings Inc. raised $612 million in one of the largest cybersecurity company IPOs ever.

Goldman Sachs Group Inc., Morgan Stanley and Allen & Co. are advising Slack on the listing. Bloomberg Beta, the venture capital arm of Bloomberg LP, is an investor in Slack.

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Trump Asserts Executive Privilege in 2020 Census Fight

President Donald Trump is asserting executive privilege over documents related to the Trump administration’s decision to add a citizenship question to the 2020 census.

The Justice Department notified the chairman of the House oversight committee of the decision in a letter Wednesday.

The committee is set to vote on whether to hold Attorney General William Barr and Commerce Secretary Wilbur Ross in contempt for failing to turn over the subpoenaed documents.

Barr says the president has made a “protective assertion” of executive privilege so the administration can fully review all of the documents.

Democrats fear the question will reduce census participation in immigrant-heavy communities, harming representation and access to federal dollars.

Republicans have criticized the hearings as a waste of time and have called for Democrats to move on.

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–The story behind the Baby Trump balloon

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–Listen to our new audio briefing, Fortune 500 Daily

Get up to speed on your morning commute with Fortune‘s CEO Daily newsletter.